Nine Stories| J.D.Salinger | Book of the day |

Nine Stories (1953) is a collection of short stories by American fiction writer J. D. Salinger published in April 1953. It includes two of his most famous short stories, “A Perfect Day for Bananafish” and “For Esmé – with Love and Squalor”. (Nine Stories is the U.S. title; the book is published in many other countries as For Esmé – with Love and Squalor, and Other Stories.)

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It is a wonderful amalgamation of wisely crafted works of J.D. Salinger.

1. Reading Experience
Timeless. The themes and its orientations, premises and characterisation – perfection.

2. Mood and Reading
The emotions will fold you, You will be thrilled by the characters and their experiences. Some of the greatest short stories you will ever read. More than just reading a story, each of its story is a masterclass in itself. Some of our pick you might like are “A perfect day for Bananafish”, “The Laughing Man”, and “Down by the Dinghy”. I think this book is a pure masterpiece and every story has its own heritage.

3. Contents
The stories are:
“A Perfect Day for Bananafish”
“Uncle Wiggily in Connecticut”
“Just Before the War with the Eskimos”
“The Laughing Man”
“Down at the Dinghy”
“For Esmé – with Love and Squalor”
“Pretty Mouth and Green My Eyes”
“De Daumier-Smith’s Blue Period”
“Teddy”

4. Selected comments from Social Media

“There are nine deep, enigmatic narratives. It is always about the motives of childlike innocence, the adult world and the invaders of war in the lives of individuals and the isolation of a traumatized man.”

“Salinger’s “Nine Stories” should be renamed “How to Write Short Stories.”

“Most of these stories make a statement (or two, or more) about how our past, and our interactions with each other, affect our lives.”

5. More about the Writer

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Jerome David Salinger was an American author, best known for his 1951 novel The Catcher in the Rye, as well as his reclusive nature. His last original published work was in 1965; he gave his last interview in 1980. Raised in Manhattan, Salinger began writing short stories while in secondary school, and published several stories in the early 1940s before serving in World War II. In 1948 he published the critically acclaimed story “A Perfect Day for Bananafish” in The New Yorker magazine, which became home to much of his subsequent work. In 1951 Salinger released his novel The Catcher in the Rye, an immediate popular success. His depiction of adolescent alienation and loss of innocence in the protagonist Holden Caulfield was influential, especially among adolescent readers. The novel remains widely read and controversial, selling around 250,000 copies a year.

The success of The Catcher in the Rye led to public attention and scrutiny: Salinger became reclusive, publishing new work less frequently. He followed Catcher with a short story collection, Nine Stories (1953), a collection of a novella and a short story, Franny and Zooey (1961), and a collection of two novellas, Raise High the Roof Beam, Carpenters and Seymour: An Introduction (1963). His last published work, a novella entitled “Hapworth 16, 1924”, appeared in The New Yorker on June 19, 1965.

Afterward, Salinger struggled with unwanted attention, including a legal battle in the 1980s with biographer Ian Hamilton, and the release in the late 1990s of memoirs written by two people close to him: Joyce Maynard, an ex-lover; and Margaret Salinger, his daughter. In 1996, a small publisher announced a deal with Salinger to publish “Hapworth 16, 1924” in book form, but amid the ensuing publicity, the release was indefinitely delayed. He made headlines around the globe in June 2009, after filing a lawsuit against another writer for copyright infringement resulting from that writer’s use of one of Salinger’s characters from The Catcher in the Rye. Salinger died of natural causes on January 27, 2010, at his home in Cornish, New Hampshire.


Published by

Gautam Kumar

A poet who writes poetry.

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